Spot-tailed Quoll

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Spot-tailed Quoll

Dasyurus maculatus


Usually hunts alone at night, sometimes during the day. Good climber. Uses tree hollows for shelter and fallen trees as runways. Breeds in late autumn to early winter so that young become independent in early summer when food is most abundant. Up to six young per litter, in grass-lined underground den. Introduced predators including foxes and cats eat the quoll's food supply, as well as prey upon the quolls directly.


Details Description
Type
Mammal
Group
Marsupial
Other Common Names
Tiger Quoll, Spotted-tailed Quoll, Native Cat
Identifying Characteristics

Body fur red or brown, sometimes black, with white spots on body and tail, yellow-grey underneath. Body up to 75 cm, tail up to 55 cm.

Distinctive Markings

White spots on tail.

Diet

Carnivore. Eats medium-sized birds, possums, bandicoots, mice and insects.

Habitat

Lives in dry forests, sclerophyll forests and coastal scrub.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Sounds
Deep hissing and screeches.
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Dasyuromorphia
Family
Dasyuridae
Genus
dasyurus
Species
Maculatus
Small populations across eastern Australia, mainly central and southern Victoria and Tasmania.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Endangered
FFG Act
Listed as threatened
EPBC Act
Endangered
FFG Action Statement

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.

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