Yellow-rumped Thornbill

Photo(s): 

Yellow-rumped Thornbill

Acanthiza chrysorrhoa


Breeds July-December. Arboreal nests are built by a pair and often other helpers. Clutch size is three. Females incubate the eggs and the male and other helpers will feed and protect the young. The nest has a false upper section, perhaps to deter predators or cuckoos, or as a practise nest for helpers or a roosting place for fledglings or the male. This species is often found in flocks with other thornbills or ground-feeding birds.


Details Description
Type
Bird
Group
Thornbill
Other Common Names
Yellow-tailed Thornbill
Identifying Characteristics

The largest thornbill (11-12 cm). Grey-olive to grey-brown above and cream below. This species has a white, spotted black crown and a dark eye stripe.

Distinctive Markings

Distinctive yellow rump.

Diet

Carnivore. Mainly insects but sometimes seeds. Ground-feeding mainly although occasionally will feed in trees or shrubs.

Habitat

Grassy woodlands, scrublands, farms and gardens.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Sounds
Cheery, tinkling often lasting just 3 or 4 seconds. '"chip - chip - chippity - cheepity - chippety - cheepity - wheiy - wheehoo".
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Passeriformes
Family
Acanthizidae
Genus
Acanthiza
Wide distribution across western, southern and eastern Australia and Tasmania. Also found in southern parts of the Northern Territory and on the Nullarbor in Western Australia.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.

Audio samples: