Wedge-tailed Eagle

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Wedge-tailed Eagle

Aquila audax


Breeds June-October. They are monogamous and mate for life. Established breeding pairs are territorial and will occupy the same area, defending their nest site from other Wedge-tailed Eagles and other intruders. The nest is a huge structure made from sticks, generally constructed in a tree fork or limb.


Details Description
Type
Bird
Group
Raptor
Identifying Characteristics

Male 90 cm-1.1 m. Female larger. A large dark coloured eagle with a light bill, wingspan up to 2.8 m, fully feathered legs and a long wedge shaped tail. Older males are almost black with red-brown hackles on the nape and a tawny band across the wing. Younger and immature are browner in colour.

Distinctive Markings

Observed overhead, very dark underside with a pale line at the base of the flight feathers along the underwing. Very distinctive wedge-shaped tail.

Diet

Carnivore. Feeds on live prey and carrion. Live prey includes mostly rabbits and hares, however lizards, mammals and other birds may also be eaten. Carrion and roadkill is often a source of food.

Habitat

Forests to treeless plains.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Sounds
Calls in the breeding season or overhead "tsIET-you, tsIET-you". A yelping sound may also be heard.
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Falconiformes
Family
Accipitridae
Genus
Aquila
Species
audax
Mainland Australia and Tasmania.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.

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