Trapdoor Spider

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Trapdoor Spider

Stanwellia sp.


Feeds at night, catching its prey by waiting for an insect to ‘trip’ the silken threads outside the burrow. It then rushes out to grab its prey. Despite its common name, the entrance of this spider's burrow does not have a 'trap-door'. Trap-door spiders can live up to 20 years.


Details Description
Type
Invertebrate
Group
Arachnid - Spider
Identifying Characteristics

A large spider. Females are light to dark brown, up to 35 mm in length and males are up to 25 mm in length. The abdomen is often paler than the rest of the spider and has a dark, mottled pattern. Males may have golden hairs on their head.

Distinctive Markings

A large spider with a dark, mottled rib-like pattern on the upper surface of its abdomen.

Diet

Carnivore. Eats insects.

Habitat

A ground-dwelling spider that digs silk-lined burrows up to 40 cm deep in soft earth.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Bites/Sting
Due to the size of its fangs, the Trapdoor spider can inflict a painful wound, but the venom is not known to cause medical problems.
Taxonomy
Phylum
Arthropoda
Class
Arachnida
Order
Araneae
Family
Nemesiidae
Genus
Stanwellia
Species
sp.
Found across southern Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.