Swamp Wallaby

Photo(s): 

Swamp Wallaby

Wallabia bicolor


Active during the day but are shy and usually solitary. Breeds throughout the year. The joey leaves the pouch after 8-9 months and is weaned at about 15 months old. Swamp wallablies can start breeding at 15-18 months old.


Details Description
Type
Mammal
Group
Marsupial
Other Common Names
Black Wallaby, Black-tailed Wallaby
Identifying Characteristics

Upper body fur dark brown, underneath is yellow to orange-rufous brown. Face dark, often with a white stripe. A stocky body up to 85 cm, tail up to 86 cm.

Distinctive Markings

Dark face with white stripe from upper lip below eye towards the ear. Forehead, crown and base of dark ears rufous. When disturbed, rapidly bounds away with the first few leaps being quite noisy.

Diet

Herbivore. Eats grasses and seedlings but mostly shrub leaves and ferns.

Habitat

Thick undergrowth in woodland and forest. Shelters in dense grass, bracken or shrubs during the day.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Diprotodontia
Family
Macropodidae
Genus
Wallabia
Species
bicolor
Eastern Australia, including most of Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.