Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

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Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Cacatua galerita


Breeds August-January in southern Australia. A gregarious species, spending much of the time in flocks. Eggs are laid in tree hollows that are prepared by both sexes. Both birds incubate and care for the chicks. Chicks remain with the parents all year round. Family groups will stay together indefinitely.


Details Description
Type
Bird
Group
Cockatoo
Other Common Names
White Cockatoo
Identifying Characteristics

Large, white parrot. Dark, grey-black bill. Sexes are similar. Size 44-51 cm.

Distinctive Markings

Distinctive sulphur-yellow crest and yellowish wash on underside of wings.

Diet

Herbivore. Includes berries, nuts, seeds and plant roots.

Habitat

A variety of timbered habitats and around human settlements.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Sounds
Loud, raucous screeches and piercing, sharp sounds.
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Psittaciformes
Family
Cacatuidae
Genus
Cacatua
Species
galerita
Range extends throughout the northern and eastern parts of mainland Australia and Tasmania. Small populations exist around Perth in Western Australia, New Guinea and the Anu Islands. Introduced into New Zealand and Indonesia.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.

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