Garden Mantis

Photo(s): 

Garden Mantis

Orthodera ministralis


Solitary. They can keep very still for long periods of time to ambush prey as it moves past, seizing the prey with their powerful forelegs. Females lay hundreds of eggs inside a foamy substance which hardens into a case, usually attached to a leaf, stem, wall or fence.


Details Description
Type
Invertebrate
Group
Insect - Mantis
Other Common Names
Green Mantid
Identifying Characteristics

Elongated body up to 4 cm in length, green, with the thorax slightly wider than the head and abdomen. A blue to purple spot on the inside of the front legs. Adult males have wings, females have only wingbuds.

Distinctive Markings

Large bulging eyes in a triangular head, and a wide thorax. Blue spot on front legs.

Diet

Carnivore. Eats many crop and garden pests. They are eaten by insectivorous mammals, birds, lizards and hunting wasps.

Habitat

Lives in a wide range of vegetation types, including gardens.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Taxonomy
Phylum
Arthropoda
Class
Insecta
Order
Mantodea
Family
Mantidae
Genus
Orthodera
Species
ministralis
Found throughout Australia, including across Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.