Fat-tailed Dunnart

Photo(s): 

Fat-tailed Dunnart

Sminthopsis crassicaudata


Nocturnal. Shelters (sometimes in groups) in a grass nest they make in hollow logs or under grass tussocks, rocks or logs.  Their flexible breeding pattern means they can breed quickly anytime between late winter to late summer when there is enough food. Dunnarts can have 2 to 3 litters per season with up to 10 young per litter. The young are weaned at 10 weeks. Dunnarts have short sharp teeth suited to crunching insects and spiders. Their scats have visible insect remains. The use of agricultural pesticides could affect their survival.


Details Description
Type
Mammal
Group
Marsupial
Other Common Names
Fat-tailed Marsupial Mouse
Identifying Characteristics

Body fur yellow-brown, darker around eyes and white underneath. Large ears and a pointed nose. Tail very wide at the base. Hind feet long and white. Body up to 9 cm, tail up to 6 cm.

Distinctive Markings

Fat tail, yellow-brown fur with white underneath, large ears and eyes.

Diet

Carnivore. Eats ground dwelling invertebrates such as beetles, spiders, earthworms and insect larvae. Does not need to drink as it obtains enough water from its food.

Habitat

Can live in a wide variety of habitats but prefers open areas such as grasslands and low shrublands with scattered fallen trees or rocks.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Dasyuromorphia
Family
Dasyuridae
Genus
Sminthopsis
Species
crassicaudata
Central and southern Australia, including western and central Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Near threatened
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.