European Earwig

Photo(s): 

European Earwig

Forficula auricularia


Nocturnal. European Earwigs can occur in large numbers at times. They can be a pest as they damage young plants. Adults can use their pincers in defense, twisting their abdomen forward over their head or sideways to fight an enemy, often another earwig.


Details Description
Type
Invertebrate
Group
Insect - Earwig
Identifying Characteristics

Body dark brown to reddish brown, up to 14 mm in length, excluding the pincers.

Distinctive Markings

A pair of long, pointed tail pincers. Dark brown body.

Diet

Omnivore. Eats aphids, spiders, caterpillar pupae, leaf beetle eggs, scale insects and springtails. Also eats vegetable matter including flowers, fungi and algae.

Habitat

Hides in leaf debris, cracks and crevices during the day. Can be found on flowers at night.

Native Status
Introduced
Taxonomy
Phylum
Arthropoda
Class
Insecta
Order
Dermaptera
Family
Forficulidae
Genus
Forficula
Species
auricularia
Native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. Introduced to Australia.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.