Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland)

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Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland)

Perameles gunnii


Active at night. Can breed throughout the year, but mostly between July to November. Pregnancy lasts just 12 days, so they can produce up to five litters of young per year, with an average litter size of two.  Can breed after 4 months of age. Average lifespan is 18 months to 2 years. Males need 13-20 hectares while females need 2-3 hectares.


Details Description
Type
Mammal
Group
Marsupial
Other Common Names
Tasmanian Barred Bandicoot
Identifying Characteristics

Upper body fur brown and grey, marked with three or four pale stripes on its hindquarters, white underparts and feet. Long nose and ears. Short white tail. Body up to 35 cm, tail up to 11 cm.

Distinctive Markings

White stripes on rear of back, short white tail, long nose.

Diet

Omnivore. Small invertebrates including worms, beetles, crickets, moths, cicadas and caterpillars.  Plant bulbs and tubers including the Plains Yam Daisy, fruits and fungi.

Habitat

Natural habitat is tall, dense native grasslands and grassy woodlands, although they can live in modified habitats if there is suitable shelter and control of predators such as cats and foxes.

Native Status
Native to Australia. Once widespread across western Victoria.
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Peramelemorphia
Family
Peramelidae
Genus
Perameles
Species
gunnii
South-eastern Australia, including south-western Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Extinct in the Wild
FFG Act
Listed as threatened
EPBC Act
Endangered
FFG Action Statement

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.