Common Yabbie

Photo(s): 

Common Yabbie

Cherax destructor


Nocturnal. Digs deep burrows in the soil, including in levee banks and dam walls. Survives over summer and long droughts in their burrows. Can survive in poor water quality. Prolific breeders when conditions are suitable. Females look after hatchlings for several weeks in a brood chamber under their tail. Life span of 5-7 years. 


Details Description
Type
Invertebrate
Group
Crustacean
Identifying Characteristics

Total body length up to 16 cm. Upper shell (carapace) length 7 cm. Broad, spade-like claws. Body generally pale to dark brown in colour.

Distinctive Markings

Smooth exoskeleton (outer shell).

Diet

Omnivore. Mainly eats vegetation, especially rotting leaves and plant detritus, worms and insects.

Habitat

Semi-aquatic. Freshwater creeks, rivers, lakes, farm dams, swamps, floodplains and irrigation channels. They prefer silty shallow water that is slow flowing or still.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Taxonomy
Phylum
Arthropoda
Class
Malacostraca
Order
Decapoda
Family
Parastacidae
Genus
Cherax
Species
destructor
Most of Victoria and also the eastern part of South Australia, central and western New South Wales and south-western Queensland.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.