Australian White Ibis

Photo(s): 

Australian White Ibis

Threskiornis molucca


Breeding season is between June and November in southern Australia. This species breeds in large colonies alongside herons, egrets and spoonbills. Rough, loose platforms are built in trees standing in water. Two to five eggs are produced and incubated by both sexes. Incubation time is 20-23 days. One or two broods may be raised each year.


Details Description
Type
Bird
Group
Ibis
Other Common Names
Sacred Ibis
Identifying Characteristics

Grows between 65-75 cm tall. Long down-curved bill. Bare black skin on head, neck and legs. White plumage.

Distinctive Markings

During the breeding season, the small patch of skin on the undersurface of the wing changes from a dull pink to a dark scarlet.

Diet

Omnivore, terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates including crayfish and mussels, also human scraps.

Habitat

Shallow fresh and tidal wetland and pasture.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Sounds
A deep grunted "urrrk".
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Ciconiiformes
Family
Threskiornithidae
Genus
Threskiornis
Species
molucca
Common and widespread in northern and eastern Australia. Range and abundance in Western Australia is expanding. Absent from Tasmania.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.

Audio samples: