Australian Swamp Rat

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Australian Swamp Rat

Rattus lutreolus


Swamp Rats need dense plant growth so they can build long tunnels though the vegetation. Females need good spring growth of grasses and sedges to establish a territory of about 0.5 hectares before they can breed. They can have several litters of up to five young per year.  Frequent fires will prevent Swamp Rats from living in an area.


Details Description
Type
Mammal
Group
Placental
Other Common Names
Eastern Swamp-rat
Identifying Characteristics

Body fur dark grey or grey-brown. Feet brown. Tail dark brown and shorter than the body. Body up to 20 cm, tail up to 14 cm.

Distinctive Markings

Dark brown fur, dark tail shorter than body, brown feet.

Diet

Herbivore. Eats stems of grasses and sedges; also eats insects in winter.

Habitat

Lives in grassy, heathy, and sedge habitats.

Native Status
Native to Australia
Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Rodentia
Family
Muridae
Genus
Rattus
Species
lutreolus
Eastern Australia, including southern Victoria.

Distribution maps indicate current and historic locations where species have been sighted.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

Conservation Status
DEPI Advisory List
Not listed
FFG Act
Not listed
EPBC Act
Not listed

The conservation status of species is listed within Victoria and Australia.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) Advisory List consists of non-statutory advisory lists of rare or threatened flora and fauna within Victoria.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act) lists threatened species in Victoria. Under the Act, an Action Statement is produced for each listed species.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s key piece of environmental legislation, listing nationally threatened native species and ecological communities.